Tag: below threshold tenders

Why we love low value tenders

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Low value tenders are those which aren’t published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) as they are below the EU threshold set at £106,047.

More information can be found about thresholds in our blog post, but what are the key benefits of low value tenders?

For SMEs and companies who have no experience of working in the public sector, low value tenders are a good starting point. Securing a few low value contracts allows smaller suppliers to build up a body of work that can help them go after high value OJEU notices in the future.

Here are the five key benefits of low value tenders:

Continue reading “Why we love low value tenders”

Millstream Associates announce 14% rise in UK-wide Construction tenders

The North East of England is to benefit from new public sector business opportunities in the construction industry as leading e-tender service provider Millstream Associates attends local event.

Millstream Associates will be showcasing their flagship product Tenders Direct, at Constructionline’s North East Meet the Buyer event in Sedgefield, on Thursday 10th September 2015.

The construction industry accounts for 6.1% of the total economic output in the UK, worth £103bn and resulting in 2.10million jobs in 2014. The industry has experienced fluctuations in growth since the recession, but from 2013 Continue reading “Millstream Associates announce 14% rise in UK-wide Construction tenders”

You snooze, you lose!

If you have ever attempted to read the public procurement directives then you will know there are a number of regulations governing the advertising and award of public sector contracts. 

Contracts that fall below the EC procurement thresholds are not subject to these directives.  Below threshold contracts are subject to the rules and principles of the EC Treaty (including non-discrimination, equal treatment, transparency etc), and European Court of Justice case-law has indicated these contracts should be ‘sufficiently’ advertised.  However, aside from these rather ambiguous guidelines, there are no real rules regulating these contracts. 

OJEU tenders are required to follow specific regulations on timescales to allow suppliers adequate time to respond to tenders, not usually less than 22 days.  Below threshold tenders, however, often have much tighter deadlines.  To make this situation worse, below threshold contracts are found in literally hundreds of places, including websites, local and national newspapers, and trade journals, meaning that they cannot always be identified as soon as they are advertised.

It is therefore particularly important to respond to these contracts as soon as possible.  In fact, regardless of whether it is a below threshold or OJEU tender, it is advisable to make initial contact with the awarding authority as early as possible.  This can only increase the time you have to prepare your bid or Pre-Qualification Questionnaire.  It also means that the authority should keep you informed of any changes or further information relating to the tender.  Responding to the tender notice does not bind you to bidding for the contract, but if you miss the deadline, then you have missed your opportunity.  As the old saying goes “you snooze, you lose!”

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